Making sense of the different versions of .NET Core (runtime and SDK)

The .NET Core journey has been confusing for most. We’ve had alphas, betas and release candidates. All the way through, both the Runtime and Tools (SDK) have been changing at a rapid pace. Microsoft decided late on to drop the new project.json file in favour of a revamped csproj project file. Consequently your applications created using older versions of the …

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Add MVC to your ASP.NET 1.1 application using the dotnet command line

If you’re using Visual Studio Code or another text editor to work on your ASP.NET Core web app then you’ll want to know how to add (and start using) MVC/Web API. Last time out we started with a minimal ASP.NET Core web app using this command. The web template doesn’t automatically set up MVC (there are other templates that do) …

Create a minimal ASP.NET Core 1.1 web application using the command line

You want to build a .NET Core web application and keep it to the bare minimum files and dependencies to start with. We all remember the “Basic” vs “Empty” MVC templates from Visual Studio’s recent past. Do you want your app empty, or really empty?! Happily you can go minimal using .NET Core and start with nothing more than a …

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Use ASP.NET Core 1.1 with .NET 4.6 (without Visual Studio)

If you want to try out ASP.NET Core but still target the full framework (e.g. 4.x) you can. All you need is a simple tweak to your .csproj file. In earlier versions of .NET Core this change was made via project.json but Microsoft retired project.json in favour of an MSBuild compatible csproj file. Why would I want to target .NET …

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Create an Angular 2 and .NET Core app that can be edited using Visual Studio 2017

In the recent series on using Angular 2 and .NET Core to check the weather we used the ASP.NET Core Template Pack to save time manually installing/configuring Webpack, Node, Angular etc. That works well if you want to create your new projects using the new project wizard in Visual Studio 2015. But what if you’re using using Visual Studio 2017? …

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Send form input via an Angular 2 component to ASP.NET Core Web API

This is post 6 of 6 in the series “Checking the weather with Angular 2 and ASP.NET Core” So far we’ve set up a basic Angular 2 and .NET Core web application and made it retrieve the weather for London which is then displayed via an Angular 2 component. However, unless all of your users live in London, you’ll want …

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Fetch the current weather using ASP.NET Core Web API and OpenWeather

This is post 5 of 6 in the series “Checking the weather with Angular 2 and ASP.NET Core” Sometimes you need to access someone else’s API from your web application. Here we’ll take a look at calling the OpenWeather API from a Web API controller in your .NET Core web app. So far we’ve created an Angular 2 .NET Core …

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Display the weather using Angular 2 and .NET Core Web API

This is post 4 of 6 in the series “Checking the weather with Angular 2 and ASP.NET Core” So far we’ve created a new Angular 2/.NET Core project, designed our first basic HelloWorld component and configured routing to go directly to it. But let’s say you want to do something more interesting (and useful), you want to get some data …

Angular 2 and .NET Core – route directly to your components

This is post 3 of 6 in the series “Checking the weather with Angular 2 and ASP.NET Core” Last time out we took a quick look at creating a simple HelloWorld component and displayed it on one of our existing web pages using its selector. Which rendered something like this… Using the helloworld selector you can now include this component …

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Angular 2 and .NET Core – your first component

This is post 2 of 6 in the series “Checking the weather with Angular 2 and ASP.NET Core” Now you’ve taken the quick route to getting an Angular 2 and .NET Core app up and running, what have you actually got? If you haven’t already, hit CTRL-F5 and take a quick look around the app. The home page tells you …